The National Day Laborer Organizing Network – A case study

National Day Laborer Organizing Network—NDLON: (http://www.ndlon.org)
Founded: 2001

Campaigns:
The NDLON is an organization that works to improve the lives of day laborers in the United States.  Their goal is to promote Civil and Labor Rights for these workers, so they can benefit from safer and humane working conditions and earn a living.  Their current major campaign is “Alto Arizona”, an extremely popular movement against SB1070.  The organization also devotes a significant amount of time towards leadership development, so that workers can strategically affect change on the working and living conditions.  The use of their website and various mainstream social media tools has been vital to the NDLON movement.  The most thorough information can be found on the main website, but the social media tools brings the information to the members.

Public Social Media:
1)    The NDLON Facebook is a well-maintained page with 2,157 followers.  There are frequent postings encouraging users to sign petitions, send emails to legislators, or read news articles pertaining to the organization.  This Facebook is updated through a program called HootSuite that allows the account manager to update any Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Ping, Myspace, or Foursquare account through one site (NDLON only uses Facebook and Twitter); therefore, the information found on the NDLON Twitter page is the same information found on the Facebook.  In addition, the account manager can track the statistical effectiveness of each posting through HootSuite by counting the number of ‘clicks’ each link receives on each specific site.  These sites are more interactive in nature and allow members to learn new information and discuss their opinion.

2)    NDLON also use Youtube and Vimeo accounts to post relevant videos.  Neither of these pages is extremely active, considering the Youtube channel contains six videos and the Vimeo page contains only three (all posted 8 months ago).  The Youtube page seems successful because the six videos have been viewed nearly 70,000 times since March 2010.  In addition, there is a Flickr page that has active photo streams of NDLON movements across the nation.  These sites are more informational and less a venue where members can interact with one another.

3)    The Alto Arizona movement is using SMS to fundraise their cause.  “Text ‘Arizona’ to 50555.”

*Each of these sites can be followed via SMS by signing up on each specific site.

Highlighted uses of social media:
Youtube:

1)  Video:
This video captures the grand opening of the Day Laborer Center in Mountain View, California.  This may provide an example for other Day Labor organizations that want to provide resources to their local workers.

2)  Video:
Another type of video that can be seen on the NDLON Youtube page are promotional videos.  There are a variety of celebrities that voice their support for NDLON’s causes.  For example, Manu Chao is endorsing the Alto Arizona campaign.

3)  Video:
These videos show unjust events that are important for Day Laborers to be aware of.

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NDLON
The Facebook page is most effective in delivering relevant information to followers and allowing them to voice their opinion.  One aspect of the page that can be improved is their use of the discussion tab that could contain forums in which laborers could discuss important concerns.

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ndlon/
This site contains pictures from various NDLON events.  This site could be improved if viewers were encouraged to comment and engage in dialogue with one another.

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